Archives for category: Tiny House

After a week of being on the brink of a nervous breakdown, things seem to be normalizing and coming together.

Why a nervous breakdown, you ask? (and if you don’t ask…it’s my blog, so there you go.)

Stress. Killer of joy, spasm-er of muscles, and destroyer of good attitudes. Don’t get me wrong. My excitement level of moving into a Tiny Home has merely increased by the day. That excitement is part of the stress. I want to go now, but now is not the time.

So, what can I do until August? How can I manage this stress that gives me intense nausea, intestinal spasms, and knotty shoulders?

My doctor’s advice: Chill Out.

My therapist’s advice: Chill Out.

My parents’ advice: Don’t Move To Colorado.

My husband’s advice: Take a Xanax.

Husband’s advice is almost immediately gratifying, as the medicine forces a calm in me. My parents aren’t getting their way on this one, so that adds another stressor, rather than being an idea for relieving one. As far as the medical professionals go, I would like to follow their advice. However, I don’t know how to “Chill Out”, or I would have done it already.

Yoga. Walking. Exercise. Healthy diet. Get organized. Hang out with friends.

Even this list is stressing me out, because it isn’t grammatically parallel.

Where is the peace? I know where. Depending on God is not something I’ve ever been particularly good at, but like anything worth excelling at, it takes practice.

How do you actively pursue peace in a world of stress and mess?

We have a lot of stuff. A love of video games has kept us young, in that we like toys and posters. Although some might say our home looks like a college dorm room, we’re just really into what we’re into.

However, now that we’re drastically down-sizing, some of the stuff has to go. I’ve posted a list paper in each room, entitled “Must Keep”! My husband and I both add to the lists in order to be intentional about what we’re keeping, and what we’re leaving behind.

Truth? I love getting rid of stuff. I just want it out of the house. How to choose, though? What is worth keeping? What is sellable, tossable, or donateable? How can I incorporate an attitude of peace and minimalist living into our new home?

When I have these deep, difficult questions, I turn to the internet — source of all organizational wisdom. The internet would like me to use well-defined criteria, bins, and all sorts of things I’m just disinclined to incorporate.

My husband and I have developed a system, as we’re moving towards moving:

  • Will getting rid of it make me cry?
  • Have I touched it or thought about it lately?
  • Where will it go, once we sell the house?

As I’m sure you can tell, this system is very precise, super logical, and involves no emotion at all…

But, it is only January. We have time. I’ve gotten myself into quite the tizzy, putting the cart before the horse and what-not, and thankfully, my husband has had the reminder ready that we have to take this one step at a time. We can’t get rid of everything today. Deliberation takes time, and I’m a slow processor. The internet has list after list of what I should toss or keep, but only I can make the ultimate decision. Regret is not going to be a part of this process!

What is your go-to system for getting rid of the excess in  your life? What allowances have you made for yourself in deciding what to keep or toss?

In the previous post, I discussed the base price for my top three (for now) Tiny House builders.

The statement about Tiny Homes that I get the most laughs from is, “They have free delivery.” How would you like your house brought to you in the same manner you no doubt received last night’s pizza?

All kinds of weird considerations go into this Tiny Home thing. I’m sure I will eventually have a post on the headaches of zoning and permits. I’ve already planned a post about the difficulty I’ve had even finding a place even to park it (Who wouldn’t want a Tiny Home in their RV lot? As it turns out…almost everyone!).

So, one thing I’ve learned to look for in Tiny Home builders is their shipping policy. Their FAQ pages are an abundance of knowledge. It’s all the questions you didn’t even know you were supposed to ask!

Delivery Policies:

Heirloom: As with many high-end products, you also receive high-end service. Heirloom’s FAQ page says that they provide free shipping with their Tiny Homes, so it may be worth your while to give their higher price tag a second look.

Brevard: You won’t find delivery policies on their site, because per Brevard’s FAQ page, that is a service they do not provide. The company is located in North Carolina, and they can make recommendations of haulers to unite you with your Tiny Home!

Perch & Nest: While I was unable to find a definitive statement of delivery cost on their site, I did find a note that P&N will deliver and set up your home for you. Now, whether that is a paid portion of their service, I don’t know, but the phrasing suggests to me that they offer free delivery, or pack it into their pricing model.

I can honestly say that I have no schema for the price of delivering a house across the country. It’s just not something I’m accustomed to participating in.

What was the process you experienced in the delivery of your Tiny Home?

 

In the previous post, I gave a list of links to the tiny home builders that I’ve most enjoyed spending hours looking at.

However, if I were to attempt a point-by-point comparison between them all, I would bore you to death. You may be bored to death, already.

I will discuss my three favorites — Tiny Heirloom, Brevard Tiny House, and Perch & Nest. I know I said in the previous post I was going to look at Liberation, but it’s my blog, and I changed my mind.

This first comparison focuses on cost. In the next post, I’ll start to look at these:

  • Base Model Price
  • Free Shipping/Delivery (or not!)
  • Degree of Furnishing Included*

All three models have my non-negotiables:

  • Fridge
  • Washer/Dryer Combo
  • Loft sleeping
  • Stairs (for our pups!)
  • 24′ in length
  • On wheels

A common thread through the advice I’ve read is to make sure the Tiny Home meets your minimum needs. Make sure the kitchen has the appliances that apply to your life. I cook frequently, so a stove, an oven, and enough counter space are essential. Some models of Tiny Homes don’t include more than a mini-fridge!

As we search for a Tiny Home as our primary residence, we are trying to keep our daily habits in mind. It’s really easy to get worked up and excited about this potential bundle of cuteness making its way into our life, but Tiny Home living isn’t for everyone. For example, my mother can’t handle small spaces, and the the extreme charm of a Tiny House isn’t going to change that.

What are the non-negotiables in your perfect Tiny House?

The question: What exactly is a Tiny Home? If you’re on Pinterest (which, of course, I am), you may have seen the Tiny Home trend as it has rapidly and adorably evolved.

At first glance, these Tiny Homes are impossibly whimsical — that hexagonal tile your grandmother had in her bathroom, the wanderlust of a home on wheels, the lofted bed you always wanted as a pre-teen.

Here’s what you should know about my bias in all this:

  • I currently own a 2100 square foot ranch-style home.
  • My home cost $130,000 in 2014, and was built in 1970.
  • I use two of the four bedrooms as my main living areas. That’s right! That 240 square feet, plus the galley-style kitchen, is where I spend the vast majority of my time.
  • I work from home.
  • I am not one of those “yard work” people. By that, I mean I do not do yard work of any kind.

We have three gigantic oak trees. We have a crumbling foundation. We had a flood. Basically, God looked at our house and designed the unbeliever after it.

But, back to Tiny Homes.

Here are the brands I’ve researched so far:

Quite possibly, there are more to list, but these are the ones I’ve spent the most time ogling.

Problem: my brain works best in a chart system. As I was researching these companies, I simply couldn’t keep them straight. Once I closed the sites, all of the tiny houses ran together.

So, in the next several posts, I will compare the findings of my top three brands of interest — Heirloom, Brevard, and Liberation.

Share with us! What other Tiny House companies can we add to this list?

The other day, my mother suggested I watch a documentary called “Minimalism” on Netflix.

Like any consumer, I live in a world that tells me I need more. One more sweater, one more screen, one more diet, one more hamburger.

I’ve been going through a personal renaissance. In 2015, I went dairy free. At the end of 2016, I went gluten free. While these changes haven’t noticeably improved my chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and migraine, they have made me more aware of what I am consuming.

A recent $13,000 estimate to repair my nearly fifty-year-old foundation was a slap in the financial face. We don’t have that kind of money. I’m a teacher. My husband rolls burritos.

The apostles left their nets to live a life of purpose. Perhaps it is time for me to leave mine and pursue a different path.

So, in the next six months, we are selling everything, and moving into a Tiny House.

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